16 9 / 2014

14 9 / 2014

"I got nowhere else to go!" from ‘An Officer and A Gentleman"

11 9 / 2014

"During the first season I had pitched a storyline where Samira and I fall in love. The Nicky and Poussey affair! I pitched it mostly because I wanted to spend more time with her." - Natasha Lyonne (x).

(Source: mybodywakesup, via blissfullybesotted)

10 9 / 2014

maddieonthings:

Morning’ đź‘‹ (Portland, OR)

maddieonthings:

Morning’ 👋 (Portland, OR)

10 9 / 2014

trilobiter:

concretefemme:

look at this cop-hating suffragette kitty 

Old-timey feminist lol-cat.

trilobiter:

concretefemme:

look at this cop-hating suffragette kitty 

Old-timey feminist lol-cat.

(via gyabou)

10 9 / 2014

mrkinch:

1943

This is wonderful. I definitely see the resemblance with your mom! :D

mrkinch:

1943

This is wonderful. I definitely see the resemblance with your mom! :D

10 9 / 2014

09 9 / 2014

npr:

A few years ago, award-winning animal photographer Seth Casteel became an overnight sensation when his photos of dogs underwater went viral. What followed was a book deal that resulted in the New York Times best-seller Underwater Dogs.

Casteel’s new book, out Sept. 16, is possibly the only thing cuter thanUnderwater Dogs: Underwater Puppies.

Casteel on the logistics of photographing puppies underwater

I’m wearing a dog costume so that the dogs can feel like I’m one of the pack. … Just kidding. … I usually just wear a wet suit just in case. You know, if you spend 12 hours in a pool with a bunch of dogs, inevitably you’re going to get scratched up a little bit. So I do wear a wet suit. But I just hold my breath — that’s about it. I’m underwater sometimes just a few seconds, sometimes 30 seconds, 60 seconds. But I have my wet suit on. I bring the toys. I bring the fun. And we just have a blast.

Ridiculously Cute Underwater Puppies (You’re Welcome)

Photo credit: Seth Casteel/Courtesy of Little, Brown and Co.

09 9 / 2014

retrogasm:

Smurfs, 1958

retrogasm:

Smurfs, 1958

09 9 / 2014

npr:

People in Maryland love their Baltimore orioles — so much so that their major league baseball team bears the name of the migrating bird. Yet, by 2080, there may not be any orioles left in Maryland. They migrate each year and, according to a new report, could soon be forced to nest well north of the Mid-Atlantic state.

And the oriole is not alone. A seven-year study published Tuesday by the National Audubon Society warns that the migratory routes and habitats of more than half of the birds in North America are now or soon will be threatened by climate change.

More Than Half Of U.S. Bird Species Threatened By Climate Change

Photo credit: Universal Images Group via Getty Images
GIF credit: National Audubon Society